Tour the White Mountains on Snowmobile!

Jackson Library in Winter
Old man winter has graced the Mount Washington Valley with our first snow fall of nearly one foot! The Village of Jackson is covered in sparkling snowflakes, the area ski lifts are up and running and the cross country ski trails should receive the first grooming of the year any day. With November coming to a close, The Wentworth Inn is full swing into the Holiday Season with festive greenery hung and the crackle of wood burning in our signature lobby fireplace.

The Wentworth creates a warm and hospitable atmosphere for all who stay and play with us. With our array of accommodations we ensure a pleasant and entertaining stay for couples and families alike. Romance abounds as you relish in our newly constructed Thornycroft suites complete with modern amenities such as surround sound, heated bathroom floors, steam shower, plush King bed, gas burning fireplace and private outdoor hot tub. For those larger groups or families we offer two or three bedroom condominium rentals, all with 2.5 baths, full kitchen and dining area, and each decorated with its own unique charm.

Once here, the list of activities is something worth navigating and our knowledgeable front desk staff are always ready to help. With the Great North Woods just north of Jackson NH and the largest snowmobile trail system surrounding our beautiful town, view the scenic terrain in a new way this winter. Northeast Snowmobile Rentals have three convenient locations: Gorham NH, Fryeburg ME, and Bethel ME. Explore the great outdoors and begin your epic adventure with the helpful assistance of the Northeast Snowmobile Rentals crew, who will guide you through it all. They will even help you to plan out your self-guided tour from beginning to end! Single or Double person snowmobiles are available for rent, each equipped with GPS tracking. Decide you want to test out your skills on a snowmobile but left all your warm winter gear at home? No problem – they have that too!

So, pack the car, bring your adventurous side and head north to Jackson, New Hampshire. The Wentworth Inn has an elegant option just for you. Special Packages include Full Country Breakfast each morning and Farm to Restaurant four-course Dinner each evening.

Contact one of our friendly front desk agents for more information at 800-637-0013, or email us at reservations@thewentworth.com.

Snow Covered Mountains of New Hampshire

There is always a reason to stay at The Wentworth!

4 Great Kayaking and Rafting Locations in NH

Have you ever wanted to go rafting or kayaking, but haven’t had the time or didn’t know how to get started? Maybe you get a little jealous when someone drives by with a kayak on their car roof; you certainly know they’re heading on an adventure. Or maybe you’ve just thought of the thrill of navigating down a treacherous (not too treacherous though) river; water splashing in your face as you fly down the river on a hot summer’s day might provide some vivid images for your imagination.
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Spring Skiing in NH: Tuckerman’s Ravine

Spring skiing is the ideal way to get away from it all, and engage in a bit of rest and relaxation. A wild, and unspoiled, swath of mountainous territory, Tuckerman’s Ravine is the perfect combination of raw beauty, exhilarating views and pristine snow. Nestled on the shoulder of Mount Washington, this area is also home to our wonderful Inn.
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Jackson’s Pumpkin People

The Wentworth's entry for the pumpkin people

It is almost that time of year again when the pumpkin people of Jackson make their annual appearance. This will be the 25th year that Jackson Village has hosted this event. Starting in 1987 there were 17 entries and this year there will be 74 pumpkin displays. As you drive through the village with your self guided map pumpkin heads of many makes and models will pop up at local inns and businesses. We have seen Johnny Cash, John Lennon and Yoko, Doctor House, among many over the years.
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The Wentworth 18th Annual Ice Carving Competition

On Monday, January 9th we had nine carvers from around New England carve 300 lb blocks of ice into clowns, dragons, fish, a margarita bar, angels and even a road runner. Over the years we have seen these sculptures melt in as little as a few days or last until the middle of March.
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Labor Day Holiday at The Wentworth

Many of us have forgotten how Labor Day came about; to most of us it is just a long weekend – another excuse for a last minute getaway. Being in the hospitality business our staff will have to work on Labor Day, although we will get some time off after the weekend and have our annual staff golf tournament and barbeque (always a good time). The attached photo shows Ike Garland – our dishwasher since 1985 with the staff of The Wentworth when he was awarded with “Restaurant Employee of the Year for the State of NH” in the year of 1998 by the NH Lodging and Restaurant Association. We have a wonderful staff here at The Wentworth, we also have Pat Davis at the Front Desk - an employee since 1984 who was awarded Lodging Employee of the year for the state of NH in 1996, Laurie Pettengill who is along with working at The Wentworth also is one of our State Representatives and many wonderful staff that have been with us for many years and contribute so much to The Wentworth experience. Come up and visit us on Labor Day weekend, either Friday, Saturday or Sunday as we do not have any minimum stay requirements and rates start as low as $144.00 for two guests including a full breakfast for two.
We would like to remind you of the origins of Labor Day with the below information provided by the US Department of Labor Day.

 How it Came About; What it Means
Labor Day, the first Monday in September, is a creation of the labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of American workers. It constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of our country.
Founder of Labor Day
More than 100 years after the first Labor Day observance, there is still some doubt as to who first proposed the holiday for workers. Some records show that Peter J. McGuire, general secretary of the Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners and a cofounder of the American Federation of Labor, was first in suggesting a day to honor those “who from rude nature have delved and carved all the grandeur we behold.” But Peter McGuire’s place in Labor Day history has not gone unchallenged. Many believe that Matthew Maguire, a machinist, not Peter McGuire, founded the holiday. Recent research seems to support the contention that Matthew Maguire, later the secretary of Local 344 of the International Association of Machinists in Paterson, N.J., proposed the holiday in 1882 while serving as secretary of the Central Labor Union in New York. What is clear is that the Central Labor Union adopted a Labor Day proposal and appointed a committee to plan a demonstration and picnic.

The First Labor Day
The first Labor Day holiday was celebrated on Tuesday, September 5, 1882, in New York City, in accordance with the plans of the Central Labor Union. The Central Labor Union held its second Labor Day holiday just a year later, on September 5, 1883. In 1884 the first Monday in September was selected as the holiday, as originally proposed, and the Central Labor Union urged similar organizations in other cities to follow the example of New York and celebrate a “workingmen’s holiday” on that date. The idea spread with the growth of labor organizations, and in 1885 Labor Day was celebrated in many industrial centers of the country.

Labor Day Legislation
Through the years the nation gave increasing emphasis to Labor Day. The first governmental recognition came through municipal ordinances passed during 1885 and 1886. From them developed the movement to secure state legislation. The first state bill was introduced into the New York legislature, but the first to become law was passed by Oregon on February 21, 1887. During the year four more states — Colorado, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and New York — created the Labor Day holiday by legislative enactment. By the end of the decade Connecticut, Nebraska, and Pennsylvania had followed suit. By 1894, 23 other states had adopted the holiday in honor of workers, and on June 28 of that year, Congress passed an act making the first Monday in September of each year a legal holiday in the District of Columbia and the territories.

A Nationwide Holiday
The form that the observance and celebration of Labor Day should take were outlined in the first proposal of the holiday — a street parade to exhibit to the public “the strength and esprit de corps of the trade and labor organizations” of the community, followed by a festival for the recreation and amusement of the workers and their families. This became the pattern for the celebrations of Labor Day. Speeches by prominent men and women were introduced later, as more emphasis was placed upon the economic and civic significance of the holiday. Still later, by a resolution of the American Federation of Labor convention of 1909, the Sunday preceding Labor Day was adopted as Labor Sunday and dedicated to the spiritual and educational aspects of the labor movement. The character of the Labor Day celebration has undergone a change in recent years, especially in large industrial centers where mass displays and huge parades have proved a problem. This change, however, is more a shift in emphasis and medium of expression. Labor Day addresses by leading union officials, industrialists, educators, clerics and government officials are given wide coverage in newspapers, radio, and television. The vital force of labor added materially to the highest standard of living and the greatest production the world has ever known and has brought us closer to the realization of our traditional ideals of economic and political democracy. It is appropriate, therefore, that the nation pay tribute on Labor Day to the creator of so much of the nation’s strength, freedom, and leadership — the American worker.