The Wentworth 18th Annual Ice Carving Competition

On Monday, January 9th we had nine carvers from around New England carve 300 lb blocks of ice into clowns, dragons, fish, a margarita bar, angels and even a road runner. Over the years we have seen these sculptures melt in as little as a few days or last until the middle of March.
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Labor Day Holiday at The Wentworth

Many of us have forgotten how Labor Day came about; to most of us it is just a long weekend – another excuse for a last minute getaway. Being in the hospitality business our staff will have to work on Labor Day, although we will get some time off after the weekend and have our annual staff golf tournament and barbeque (always a good time). The attached photo shows Ike Garland – our dishwasher since 1985 with the staff of The Wentworth when he was awarded with “Restaurant Employee of the Year for the State of NH” in the year of 1998 by the NH Lodging and Restaurant Association. We have a wonderful staff here at The Wentworth, we also have Pat Davis at the Front Desk - an employee since 1984 who was awarded Lodging Employee of the year for the state of NH in 1996, Laurie Pettengill who is along with working at The Wentworth also is one of our State Representatives and many wonderful staff that have been with us for many years and contribute so much to The Wentworth experience. Come up and visit us on Labor Day weekend, either Friday, Saturday or Sunday as we do not have any minimum stay requirements and rates start as low as $144.00 for two guests including a full breakfast for two.
We would like to remind you of the origins of Labor Day with the below information provided by the US Department of Labor Day.

 How it Came About; What it Means
Labor Day, the first Monday in September, is a creation of the labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of American workers. It constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of our country.
Founder of Labor Day
More than 100 years after the first Labor Day observance, there is still some doubt as to who first proposed the holiday for workers. Some records show that Peter J. McGuire, general secretary of the Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners and a cofounder of the American Federation of Labor, was first in suggesting a day to honor those “who from rude nature have delved and carved all the grandeur we behold.” But Peter McGuire’s place in Labor Day history has not gone unchallenged. Many believe that Matthew Maguire, a machinist, not Peter McGuire, founded the holiday. Recent research seems to support the contention that Matthew Maguire, later the secretary of Local 344 of the International Association of Machinists in Paterson, N.J., proposed the holiday in 1882 while serving as secretary of the Central Labor Union in New York. What is clear is that the Central Labor Union adopted a Labor Day proposal and appointed a committee to plan a demonstration and picnic.

The First Labor Day
The first Labor Day holiday was celebrated on Tuesday, September 5, 1882, in New York City, in accordance with the plans of the Central Labor Union. The Central Labor Union held its second Labor Day holiday just a year later, on September 5, 1883. In 1884 the first Monday in September was selected as the holiday, as originally proposed, and the Central Labor Union urged similar organizations in other cities to follow the example of New York and celebrate a “workingmen’s holiday” on that date. The idea spread with the growth of labor organizations, and in 1885 Labor Day was celebrated in many industrial centers of the country.

Labor Day Legislation
Through the years the nation gave increasing emphasis to Labor Day. The first governmental recognition came through municipal ordinances passed during 1885 and 1886. From them developed the movement to secure state legislation. The first state bill was introduced into the New York legislature, but the first to become law was passed by Oregon on February 21, 1887. During the year four more states — Colorado, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and New York — created the Labor Day holiday by legislative enactment. By the end of the decade Connecticut, Nebraska, and Pennsylvania had followed suit. By 1894, 23 other states had adopted the holiday in honor of workers, and on June 28 of that year, Congress passed an act making the first Monday in September of each year a legal holiday in the District of Columbia and the territories.

A Nationwide Holiday
The form that the observance and celebration of Labor Day should take were outlined in the first proposal of the holiday — a street parade to exhibit to the public “the strength and esprit de corps of the trade and labor organizations” of the community, followed by a festival for the recreation and amusement of the workers and their families. This became the pattern for the celebrations of Labor Day. Speeches by prominent men and women were introduced later, as more emphasis was placed upon the economic and civic significance of the holiday. Still later, by a resolution of the American Federation of Labor convention of 1909, the Sunday preceding Labor Day was adopted as Labor Sunday and dedicated to the spiritual and educational aspects of the labor movement. The character of the Labor Day celebration has undergone a change in recent years, especially in large industrial centers where mass displays and huge parades have proved a problem. This change, however, is more a shift in emphasis and medium of expression. Labor Day addresses by leading union officials, industrialists, educators, clerics and government officials are given wide coverage in newspapers, radio, and television. The vital force of labor added materially to the highest standard of living and the greatest production the world has ever known and has brought us closer to the realization of our traditional ideals of economic and political democracy. It is appropriate, therefore, that the nation pay tribute on Labor Day to the creator of so much of the nation’s strength, freedom, and leadership — the American worker.

The Wentworth Taste of Summer Festival

In support of regional farmers, fisherman and food purveyors The Wentworth Dining Room is proud to present our Taste of Summer Festival. Our Chef creates nightly specials using the freshest ingredients he can find. Some of our most recent specials have been Veal from Northeast Family farms and here is an example of Chef Brian Gazda nightly specials:
Bone-in Veal Chop – this was served simply grilled with a salad made of fresh picked spinach, mint, feta and olives with a light lemon vinaigrette.

A popular appetizer has been Coast of Maine Calamari Salad served with a light frisee salad with a little kick added by chiles.

Chef Brian Gazda

Come and visit our AAA four diamond rated restaurant soon. we serve a Prex Fixe Menu for only $35.00 which offers a choice of any two courses plus dessert. Reservations can be made by calling us at 800-637-0013 or reserve on-line using open table.

 

Christmas at The Wentworth

The Wentworth at Christmas time

This is what memorable Christmases are made of: a magical setting, wonderful dining, festive activities and the fresh scent of holiday greenery. The inn is decked out in its holiday finery as is your guest room with its own Christmas tree.

Jackson at Christmas is magical – snow, horse-drawn sleigh rides, ice skating, downhill and cross country skiing. Sit around our fireplace in the lobby, or by our many Christmas trees, enjoy our piano music in the lounge accompanied by a festive drink … whatever your desire, The Wentworth will fulfill it.
Our package rate includes your accommodations a festive Christmas Dinner a full country breakfast and even a little Chirstmas Tree in your guest room. Call us today at 800-637-0013 to reserve.

 

 

Thanksgiving Dinner

On Thursday, November 26th we will be serving our traditional Thanksgiving dinner from 2:00pm until 8:00pm.  Let us take care of all  the details while you relax with your family and friends. Our menu offers a choice of an appetizer, soup or salad, main course and dessert. A sampling from our menu includes “Traditional Tom Turkey” with home made giblet Gravy, Tenderloin of Beef, Country Ham and Native Cod Loin.
Don’t forget desserts! Warm Old Fashioned Apple Pie, Spiced Pumpkin Pie and Pecan Pie are on offer. Call us today at 800-637-0013 to make your dinner reservation. Adults $35.00, children under 12 $17.50.

Ladies Getaway Weekend at The Wentworth

Do you want to get away from all the hustle and bustle of everyday life?  What better way to escape the day to day routine than at a beautiful country inn with girlfriends?

Here at The Wentworth we would love to treat you and your friends to a weekend full of shopping and relaxation.  Join us for a Friday and Saturday evening for great conversations among friends.  Your room rate will include accommodations for 1, breakfast both mornings in our Main Dining Room, $15 voucher to our gift shop, shopping coupons for Settlers Green Outlet Plaza in North Conway, dinner one night at the hotel and a voucher worth $50 from Debony’s Hair Salon in Jackson.

For rates and availablility please call The Wentworth Inn at 800-637-0013 and ask for information on the Ladies Weekend Getaway.